About Suzuri

sumi-painting

There are some materials that you need for starting Shodo (Japanese Calligraphy) and Simi-E.

Suzuri, an inkstone, is one of the main items.

An inkstone is a stone mortar for the grinding and containment of ink.

There are ones that are made with plastic, but it doesn’t work well and makes a loud noise. So, I highly recommend you purchase a real, stone Suzuri.

There are many shapes and price ranges for Suzuri to choose from.

How to make ink

You put some fresh water into the well part – it’s called “Umi” (literally “ocean”), and grind Sumi-ink on the hill area called either “Riku” or “Oka” – land and hill.

You then move some water from the Umi area and start to grind the ink at the Oka area. Make sure you make Sumi ink a circular motion and release the created ink into the ocean and repeat the process until the ink gets to a desired darkness.

How to check if the ink is strong enough to start writing.

Good, thickened, dark Sumi usually doesn’t bleed too much on rice paper yet it is smooth enough to let the brush to move freely. Always test the doneness of the ink on some rice paper before you start doing Shodo.

Read More

What is “Shodo”, Japanese Calligraphy

sumi-painting

Shodo is a Japanese word for Japanese Calligraphy, and it is written 書道. The first characator, , means “writing”, and the second character, , means “path” or “way of life”.

The Kanji (Chinese character), is often associated with many names of other Japanese

cultural activities, like 華道 Japanese flower arrangment、茶道 Japanese tea ceremony、柔道 Jyu-do、空手道 Karate-doand 剣道 Ken-do. It represents that those cultural activities and martial arts are not just learning things but they are a “way of life”.

In Shodo, it is the use of sumi paint and bamboo brushes to create calligraphy.

It’s history is very long, going back more than 2000 years. It was originally started in China, then came to Japan around the 6th century. It was part as part of Zen buddhism culture which developed in Japan.

 Japanese word, 龍 — Ryu : dragon

Read More

What does Japanese Calligraphy and Sumi-E painting mean for me?

sumi-painting

Since I was a little, I used to go to Shodo (Japanese Calligraphy) class every Sunday. My late father was a Shodo teacher and tought local children. I used to go to the community center one hour early with my father and helped him to set up and then tear down tables and mats. During the class time I was a student. I rememer that my father was always smiling and very happy during teaching calligraphy. He loved not only Shodo but teaching children as well.

I rememer that he was doing some Sumi-e paintings at home also. He often painting while looking at a sample paintings from different sumi-e books. It looked like a very difficult thing for me at that time.

I was doing Calligraphy practice every weekend until graduating Jr. High school, but I was gradually getting too busy with school activities and others things during high school era, and I was distanced from Shodo.

Many years later, after on and off bringing out some Shodo materials to write, now I’m doing Shodo and Sumi-e daily. I feel that I finally came back to my roots. I’ve been doing drawings and oil and acrylic paintings for many years. Now, I deeply appreciate my father and my heritage. I finally came to the point that I can truly understand and appreciate my cultural heritage more than ever.

Read More

About Suzuri

sumi-painting

There are some materials that you need for starting Shodo (Japanese Calligraphy) and Simi-E.

Suzuri, an inkstone, is one of the main items.

An inkstone is a stone mortar for the grinding and containment of ink.

There are ones that are made with plastic, but it doesn’t work well and makes a loud noise. So, I highly recommend you purchase a real, stone Suzuri.

There are many shapes and price ranges for Suzuri to choose from.

How to make ink

You put some fresh water into the well part – it’s called “Umi” (literally “ocean”), and grind Sumi-ink on the hill area called either “Riku” or “Oka” – land and hill.

You then move some water from the Umi area and start to grind the ink at the Oka area. Make sure you make Sumi ink a circular motion and release the created ink into the ocean and repeat the process until the ink gets to a desired darkness.

How to check if the ink is strong enough to start writing.

Good, thickened, dark Sumi usually doesn’t bleed too much on rice paper yet it is smooth enough to let the brush to move freely. Always test the doneness of the ink on some rice paper before you start doing Shodo.

Read More

What is “Shodo”, Japanese Calligraphy

sumi-painting

Shodo is a Japanese word for Japanese Calligraphy, and it is written 書道. The first characator, , means “writing”, and the second character, , means “path” or “way of life”.

The Kanji (Chinese character), is often associated with many names of other Japanese

cultural activities, like 華道 Japanese flower arrangment、茶道 Japanese tea ceremony、柔道 Jyu-do、空手道 Karate-doand 剣道 Ken-do. It represents that those cultural activities and martial arts are not just learning things but they are a “way of life”.

In Shodo, it is the use of sumi paint and bamboo brushes to create calligraphy.

It’s history is very long, going back more than 2000 years. It was originally started in China, then came to Japan around the 6th century. It was part as part of Zen buddhism culture which developed in Japan.

 Japanese word, 龍 — Ryu : dragon

Read More

What does Japanese Calligraphy and Sumi-E painting mean for me?

sumi-painting

Since I was a little, I used to go to Shodo (Japanese Calligraphy) class every Sunday. My late father was a Shodo teacher and tought local children. I used to go to the community center one hour early with my father and helped him to set up and then tear down tables and mats. During the class time I was a student. I rememer that my father was always smiling and very happy during teaching calligraphy. He loved not only Shodo but teaching children as well.

I rememer that he was doing some Sumi-e paintings at home also. He often painting while looking at a sample paintings from different sumi-e books. It looked like a very difficult thing for me at that time.

I was doing Calligraphy practice every weekend until graduating Jr. High school, but I was gradually getting too busy with school activities and others things during high school era, and I was distanced from Shodo.

Many years later, after on and off bringing out some Shodo materials to write, now I’m doing Shodo and Sumi-e daily. I feel that I finally came back to my roots. I’ve been doing drawings and oil and acrylic paintings for many years. Now, I deeply appreciate my father and my heritage. I finally came to the point that I can truly understand and appreciate my cultural heritage more than ever.

Read More

About Suzuri

sumi-painting

There are some materials that you need for starting Shodo (Japanese Calligraphy) and Simi-E.

Suzuri, an inkstone, is one of the main items.

An inkstone is a stone mortar for the grinding and containment of ink.

There are ones that are made with plastic, but it doesn’t work well and makes a loud noise. So, I highly recommend you purchase a real, stone Suzuri.

There are many shapes and price ranges for Suzuri to choose from.

How to make ink

You put some fresh water into the well part – it’s called “Umi” (literally “ocean”), and grind Sumi-ink on the hill area called either “Riku” or “Oka” – land and hill.

You then move some water from the Umi area and start to grind the ink at the Oka area. Make sure you make Sumi ink a circular motion and release the created ink into the ocean and repeat the process until the ink gets to a desired darkness.

How to check if the ink is strong enough to start writing.

Good, thickened, dark Sumi usually doesn’t bleed too much on rice paper yet it is smooth enough to let the brush to move freely. Always test the doneness of the ink on some rice paper before you start doing Shodo.

Read More

What is “Shodo”, Japanese Calligraphy

sumi-painting

Shodo is a Japanese word for Japanese Calligraphy, and it is written 書道. The first characator, , means “writing”, and the second character, , means “path” or “way of life”.

The Kanji (Chinese character), is often associated with many names of other Japanese

cultural activities, like 華道 Japanese flower arrangment、茶道 Japanese tea ceremony、柔道 Jyu-do、空手道 Karate-doand 剣道 Ken-do. It represents that those cultural activities and martial arts are not just learning things but they are a “way of life”.

In Shodo, it is the use of sumi paint and bamboo brushes to create calligraphy.

It’s history is very long, going back more than 2000 years. It was originally started in China, then came to Japan around the 6th century. It was part as part of Zen buddhism culture which developed in Japan.

 Japanese word, 龍 — Ryu : dragon

Read More

What does Japanese Calligraphy and Sumi-E painting mean for me?

sumi-painting

Since I was a little, I used to go to Shodo (Japanese Calligraphy) class every Sunday. My late father was a Shodo teacher and tought local children. I used to go to the community center one hour early with my father and helped him to set up and then tear down tables and mats. During the class time I was a student. I rememer that my father was always smiling and very happy during teaching calligraphy. He loved not only Shodo but teaching children as well.

I rememer that he was doing some Sumi-e paintings at home also. He often painting while looking at a sample paintings from different sumi-e books. It looked like a very difficult thing for me at that time.

I was doing Calligraphy practice every weekend until graduating Jr. High school, but I was gradually getting too busy with school activities and others things during high school era, and I was distanced from Shodo.

Many years later, after on and off bringing out some Shodo materials to write, now I’m doing Shodo and Sumi-e daily. I feel that I finally came back to my roots. I’ve been doing drawings and oil and acrylic paintings for many years. Now, I deeply appreciate my father and my heritage. I finally came to the point that I can truly understand and appreciate my cultural heritage more than ever.

Read More

About Suzuri

sumi-painting

There are some materials that you need for starting Shodo (Japanese Calligraphy) and Simi-E.

Suzuri, an inkstone, is one of the main items.

An inkstone is a stone mortar for the grinding and containment of ink.

There are ones that are made with plastic, but it doesn’t work well and makes a loud noise. So, I highly recommend you purchase a real, stone Suzuri.

There are many shapes and price ranges for Suzuri to choose from.

How to make ink

You put some fresh water into the well part – it’s called “Umi” (literally “ocean”), and grind Sumi-ink on the hill area called either “Riku” or “Oka” – land and hill.

You then move some water from the Umi area and start to grind the ink at the Oka area. Make sure you make Sumi ink a circular motion and release the created ink into the ocean and repeat the process until the ink gets to a desired darkness.

How to check if the ink is strong enough to start writing.

Good, thickened, dark Sumi usually doesn’t bleed too much on rice paper yet it is smooth enough to let the brush to move freely. Always test the doneness of the ink on some rice paper before you start doing Shodo.

Read More

What is “Shodo”, Japanese Calligraphy

sumi-painting

Shodo is a Japanese word for Japanese Calligraphy, and it is written 書道. The first characator, , means “writing”, and the second character, , means “path” or “way of life”.

The Kanji (Chinese character), is often associated with many names of other Japanese

cultural activities, like 華道 Japanese flower arrangment、茶道 Japanese tea ceremony、柔道 Jyu-do、空手道 Karate-doand 剣道 Ken-do. It represents that those cultural activities and martial arts are not just learning things but they are a “way of life”.

In Shodo, it is the use of sumi paint and bamboo brushes to create calligraphy.

It’s history is very long, going back more than 2000 years. It was originally started in China, then came to Japan around the 6th century. It was part as part of Zen buddhism culture which developed in Japan.

 Japanese word, 龍 — Ryu : dragon

Read More

What does Japanese Calligraphy and Sumi-E painting mean for me?

sumi-painting

Since I was a little, I used to go to Shodo (Japanese Calligraphy) class every Sunday. My late father was a Shodo teacher and tought local children. I used to go to the community center one hour early with my father and helped him to set up and then tear down tables and mats. During the class time I was a student. I rememer that my father was always smiling and very happy during teaching calligraphy. He loved not only Shodo but teaching children as well.

I rememer that he was doing some Sumi-e paintings at home also. He often painting while looking at a sample paintings from different sumi-e books. It looked like a very difficult thing for me at that time.

I was doing Calligraphy practice every weekend until graduating Jr. High school, but I was gradually getting too busy with school activities and others things during high school era, and I was distanced from Shodo.

Many years later, after on and off bringing out some Shodo materials to write, now I’m doing Shodo and Sumi-e daily. I feel that I finally came back to my roots. I’ve been doing drawings and oil and acrylic paintings for many years. Now, I deeply appreciate my father and my heritage. I finally came to the point that I can truly understand and appreciate my cultural heritage more than ever.

Read More

About Suzuri

sumi-painting

There are some materials that you need for starting Shodo (Japanese Calligraphy) and Simi-E.

Suzuri, an inkstone, is one of the main items.

An inkstone is a stone mortar for the grinding and containment of ink.

There are ones that are made with plastic, but it doesn’t work well and makes a loud noise. So, I highly recommend you purchase a real, stone Suzuri.

There are many shapes and price ranges for Suzuri to choose from.

How to make ink

You put some fresh water into the well part – it’s called “Umi” (literally “ocean”), and grind Sumi-ink on the hill area called either “Riku” or “Oka” – land and hill.

You then move some water from the Umi area and start to grind the ink at the Oka area. Make sure you make Sumi ink a circular motion and release the created ink into the ocean and repeat the process until the ink gets to a desired darkness.

How to check if the ink is strong enough to start writing.

Good, thickened, dark Sumi usually doesn’t bleed too much on rice paper yet it is smooth enough to let the brush to move freely. Always test the doneness of the ink on some rice paper before you start doing Shodo.

Read More

What is “Shodo”, Japanese Calligraphy

sumi-painting

Shodo is a Japanese word for Japanese Calligraphy, and it is written 書道. The first characator, , means “writing”, and the second character, , means “path” or “way of life”.

The Kanji (Chinese character), is often associated with many names of other Japanese

cultural activities, like 華道 Japanese flower arrangment、茶道 Japanese tea ceremony、柔道 Jyu-do、空手道 Karate-doand 剣道 Ken-do. It represents that those cultural activities and martial arts are not just learning things but they are a “way of life”.

In Shodo, it is the use of sumi paint and bamboo brushes to create calligraphy.

It’s history is very long, going back more than 2000 years. It was originally started in China, then came to Japan around the 6th century. It was part as part of Zen buddhism culture which developed in Japan.

 Japanese word, 龍 — Ryu : dragon

Read More

What does Japanese Calligraphy and Sumi-E painting mean for me?

sumi-painting

Since I was a little, I used to go to Shodo (Japanese Calligraphy) class every Sunday. My late father was a Shodo teacher and tought local children. I used to go to the community center one hour early with my father and helped him to set up and then tear down tables and mats. During the class time I was a student. I rememer that my father was always smiling and very happy during teaching calligraphy. He loved not only Shodo but teaching children as well.

I rememer that he was doing some Sumi-e paintings at home also. He often painting while looking at a sample paintings from different sumi-e books. It looked like a very difficult thing for me at that time.

I was doing Calligraphy practice every weekend until graduating Jr. High school, but I was gradually getting too busy with school activities and others things during high school era, and I was distanced from Shodo.

Many years later, after on and off bringing out some Shodo materials to write, now I’m doing Shodo and Sumi-e daily. I feel that I finally came back to my roots. I’ve been doing drawings and oil and acrylic paintings for many years. Now, I deeply appreciate my father and my heritage. I finally came to the point that I can truly understand and appreciate my cultural heritage more than ever.

Read More